MIDWESTERN MAGIC

Three design firms in the American heartland make unique contributions to the global attractions industry.
by Ben Cober, InPark Magazine

In the United States, the attractions industry is sometimes perceived as a coastal industry because of the theme park destination hubs of Orlando and Los Angeles (with attendant creative/vendor communities) and the many venerable design firms in New England. This is an oversimplification, of course. The industry is culturally and geographically varied and diverse. Its regional riches span a wide range of attractions, and numerous world-class design firms call the American Midwest home while serving a regional, national and global clientele.

CHICAGO’S NIGHT SKY

Thanks to light pollution, you probably can’t see Chicago’s night sky. New Adler exhibit explores it.
by Steve Johnson, Chicago Tribune

In the United States, the attractions industry is sometimes perceived as a coastal industry because of the theme park destination hubs of Orlando and Los Angeles (with attendant creative/vendor communities) and the many venerable design firms in New England. This is an oversimplification, of course. The industry is culturally and geographically varied and diverse. Its regional riches span a wide range of attractions, and numerous world-class design firms call the American Midwest home while serving a regional, national and global clientele.

‘HAMILTON’ EXHIBITION IN CHICAGO

A new kind of ‘Hamilton’ show, this time on Lake Michigan.
by Michael Paulson, The New York Times

Audrey Burcham and Grace Troelstrup got up at 5 a.m. Saturday to be sure they’d make it on time. By 7, three hours before a large “Hamilton” exhibition opened here, they were standing at the front of the line with their moms. Audrey, 12, was clutching an Alexander Hamilton doll as well as a hard-bound collection of inspirational tweets from Lin-Manuel Miranda and, of course, a Playbill: Grace, 13, was wearing a gold star “Hamilton” knit cap and toting “Hamilton: The Revolution”, the explanatory book knowns to fans as the Hamiltome. 

ROBOT REVOLUTION

They Robots: ‘Revolution’ opens at the MSI
by Steven Johnson, Chicago Tribune

On the one hand, the Museum of Science and Industry says it wants its big new showcase for cutting-edge robotics to dispel fear about the soulless mechanized creatures rising up and taking the place of humans. “The point we try to make is that it’s robots and humans, not robots or humans,” said John Beckman, director of exhibit design and development. “They don’t do anything that they’re not programmed to do.”

NUMBERS IN NATURE

‘Numbers in Nature’ hides math in plain site – and in mirror maze.
by Steven Johnson, Chicago Tribune

The fine new “Numbers in Nature: A Mirror Maze” exhibition serves two purposes of the Museum of Science and Industry. It gives the museum a permanent exhibit that covers, in its way, mathematics, filling a gap in the extensive offerings of the South Side tourism temple. And it replaces the old, vigorously outdated “Petroleum Planet” exhibition, which used to boast that – hooray! – “the average American uses approximately 1,000 gallons of crude oil EVERY year.” 

EXHIBITION REVIEW – “LEONARDO DA VINCI: MAN, INVENTOR, GENIUS”

In Chicago, Leonardo the Inventor and Decoder.
by Edward Rothstein, The New York Times

In the United States, the attractions industry is sometimes perceived as a coastal industry because of the theme park destination hubs of Orlando and Los Angeles (with attendant creative/vendor communities) and the many venerable design firms in New England. This is an oversimplification, of course. The industry is culturally and geographically varied and diverse. Its regional riches span a wide range of attractions, and numerous world-class design firms call the American Midwest home while serving a regional, national, and global clientele.